Sticky Nature of Biologically Synthesized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

I have been synthesizing iron oxide nanoparticles using plant material for quiet some time now.

I am preparing plant extractm making it alkaline and then mixing it with metal salt solution with magnetic stirring. The reaction mixture is then dried by placing it on hot plate.

But, the dried product appears to be oily/sticky....

What could be the reason for this? I am going to use as-synthesized nanoparticles for water treatment.

Will this oily nature of the product affect the efficiency of nanoparticles?

Please reply

Thanking you

Regards

Mihir

 

 

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The most probable reason for stickiness maybe the presence of secondary metabolites over the surface of nanoparticles. This phenomenon occurs commonly when "crude" plant extract are used for nanoparticles synthesis. Definitely, the stickiness will going to reduce the efficiency of nanoparticles as it hampers the contact between nanoparticle and target molecules (waste moieties).

The following efforts are suggested to tackle your problem:

1. Separation of plant extract into various fractions to characterize "active component" involved in nanoparticle synthesis.

2. FTIR measurement of capped nanoparticles to characterize "molecules" present on nanoparticle surface.

3. DLS and TEM studies of nanoparticles before and after removal of capping molecules to determine diameter of coating.

If you need any clarifications and discussions, write me on "njain.bits@gmail.com".

Good luck and regards

Navin Jain

Dear Mihir

Biological synthesized nanoparticles contains lots of plant byproduct which leads them for the sticky nature of it. Also, you try to find out the basic chemical reaction for your synthetic strategy. also wash the final product 4-5 times with ethanol and DI water. Later go for XRD, FTIR and UV and find out.

I hope this could help you.

Regards

PS

Some plants has a surfactant base compound that will encapsulate nanoparticles, so it's because of plant you are getting oily like sample. And for water treatment application definitely it will affect the efficiency of your NPs.

Regards

Imanuel


Thank you very much for your reply

Regards

Mihir
immanuel prem kumar said:

Some plants has a surfactant base compound that will encapsulate nanoparticles, so it's because of plant you are getting oily like sample. And for water treatment application definitely it will affect the efficiency of your NPs.

Regards

Imanuel


Dear Madam,

Thank you very much for your reply....

Should the nanoparticles be characterized by UV Spectrophotometer before drying the reaction mixture or after drying the reaction product?

Also, what (Plant extract or metal salt solution) can be used as basline spectra?

Thanking you

Regards

Mihir
Poonam Sharma said:

Dear Mihir

Biological synthesized nanoparticles contains lots of plant byproduct which leads them for the sticky nature of it. Also, you try to find out the basic chemical reaction for your synthetic strategy. also wash the final product 4-5 times with ethanol and DI water. Later go for XRD, FTIR and UV and find out.

I hope this could help you.

Regards

PS

Dear Mihir

You should go for UV after as well before the nanoparticles are actually extracted out of the mother solution. try to centrifuge them around 10000 rpm for 5 min and separate it from mother solution.

Which plant extract you are using as for reduction? try to do UV of powder sample as well look for yield too... Also, the suspension you get finally do have combination of metal n protein suspensions, this might interfere in final reading. Go for characterization and see what you get.

Regards

PS

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