Live from India: Indian Farmers are five years away from Nanotechnology revolution


Indian Farmers are five years away from Nanotechnology revolution

Bangalore, 11th December 2008: During the technical session “Nano Food & Agriculture” at the 2nd Bangalore Nano Prof. Dr. Basavaraj Madhusudhan, Kuvempu University commented that Indian farmers are five years away from Nanotechnology revolution. The session was chaired by Dr. Seetharam Annadana, Avesthagen. Dr. M.S. Thakur, Central Food Technological Research Institute and Dr. R. Kalpana Sastry, National Academy of Agricultural Research Management made their presentations. Bangalore Nano 2008 is jointly organised by The Department of IT, BT and Science & Technology, Govt. of Karnataka, JNCASR (Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research) and MM Activ Sci-Tech Communications at the Grand Ashok Hotel, Bangalore.

Prof. Dr. Basavaraj Madhusudhan said, “Nanotechnology promises immense possibilities for agriculture. Nano sensors in plants can detect disease and can provide nano medication. Nanotechnology can reduce agricultural waste and thus pollution. Nano lamination can improve the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. These applications should reach farmers in India in five years.”

Dr. R. Kalpana Sastry said, “There are 44 countries working on Nanotechnology in the food and agriculture field. But most of the activities are in the early stage.”

The various topics that are addressed in the 2nd Bangalore Nano 2008 are - Nano Biotechnology Health & Pharma industry & manufacturing, Nano food & agriculture, Chemicals & Nano materials, ICT & Electronics Energy, Environment & Greentech. A panel discussion will also be held on Nano Vision & Nano Mission. A special program for children "Nano for the Young" is being organized on December 12, 2008. The 2nd Bangalore Nano 2008 features a Poster Session, where-in young Scientists and Researchers are given the opportunity to share their Innovations and Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology with the Industry, Research Institutes and Venture Capitalists. About 75 posters from IITs, NITs, Michigan Technological University, CSIR, NCBS, IISc, JNCASR, AIIMS, etc. are presented during the event.

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Comment by shashi Bhushan Rana on December 13, 2008 at 2:40pm
hey anybody can send me proceeding of bagalore nano conferencc

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