10 / 2011

nanotimes October 2011


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Greetings!

Our edition of nanotimes is live now at:

 

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International investors still put their money in technology companies despite the existing difficulties in Europe. That's the good news. We are publishing the latest numbers according to the National Venture Capital Association on page 37. In the second quarter of 2011 venture capital investment activity increased by 19% in terms of both dollars and the number of deals compared to the first quarter of 2011. Most surprisingly, the software industry still received the highest level of funding for all industries (263 deals), followed by biotechnology (96 deals) and industrial/energy (75 deals).

Over the last months we have often covered the material graphene, a novel material to be used in electronics and solar cells. Now, we spoke with Dr. Elena Polyakova, CEO of Graphene Laboratories, Inc., one of the key players in graphene materials. We spoke about their products and future strategy [page 8-9].

Despite times of severe macroeconomic difficulties new innovative technologies are conquering the market. Thin Film Electronics with PARC (Xerox), for example, unveil the first scalable printed CMOS memory, the organic equivalent of CMOS circuitry called Thinfilm Addressable Memory [page 34]. The listed company Thin Film Electronics (OSLO: THIN) is a leading provider of non-volatile memory products based on the use of functional polymer materials for over 14 years. That's one reason why Thinfilm can be found on our Watchlist.

Russia is becoming one of the key players in the area of nanotechnology thanks to its state-owned enterprise RUSNANO. The company is still globally co-investing millions of dollars in firms that are strategically important to the state. The leading German venture capital company relating nanotechnology, Nanostart, is also entering the Russian market in close cooperation with RUSNANO.

That's the good news. The situation continues to be dim in Europe. It might be correct that there are several people on the other side of the Atlantic where a weakening Europe comes in handy. Generally however I think that the U.S. government and also the majority of Europeans simply want to see a political strategy where we want to go. Unfortunately, the EU doesn't have any long-term objective so far. People would even put up with a market that is flooded with lots of money only if they knew where we want to be in 2015.

 

Thomas Ilfrich

 

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Interview - Graphene Laboratories [08]


Graphene Laboratories was founded by a group of experts in the field of nanomaterials, who possess extensive experience in characterization of structural and electronic properties of graphene and deep fundamental and practical knowledge of processing graphene-based materials. 

Recently, we spoke with Dr. Elena Polyakova, CEO of Graphene Laboratories, Inc., about her company, products and future strategy.


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Companies -  [10]

3M

Accelrys
Aculon
Alcatel-Lucent
ALPS
Altair Nanotechnologies
AMRI
AMSC
Antaria
Arrowhead Research
BioMers (Nanostart)
Bruker Corporation

Cabot Corporation
CEA Leti
CVD Equipment

Dyesol

FibeRio
Flamel
Fluidigm

Headwaters

IBM
Illumina
Imec
Industrial Nanotech

Infineon

JSR Micro / CEA Leti

Kopin

Leica Microsystems
Lena Nanoceutics
Leonardo Biosystems
Liquidmetal Technologies

MagForce
Molecular Solar
Morflora

Nanoco Group
NanoInk
NanoLogix
Nanosphere
Nanostart
Neo Materials

Pall
pSivida

RUSNANO / Galen / BIND

Samsung Electronics / Cadence
Siluria Technologies
sp3 Diamond Technologies
Starpharma
Surrette Battery Company / Corvus Energy

Ultratech

Veeco
Vive Nano

Ziptronix Inc.

Zygo

 

 

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Microchip Demonstrates Concept of 'MRAM for Biomolecules' [38]

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder (CU, both USA) have developed a low-power microchip that uses a combination of microfluidics and magnetic switches to trap and transport magnetic beads. The novel transport chip may have applications in biotechnology and medical diagnostics. A key innovation in the new chip is the use of magnetic switches like those in a computer random access memory. 

The NIST/CU team used the chip to trap, release and transport magnetic beads that potentially could be used as transport vehicles for biomolecules such as DNA. Conventional microfluidics systems use pumps and valves to move particles and liquids through channels. Magnetic particle transport microchips offer a new approach to microfluidics but generally require continuous power and in some cases cooling to avoid sample damage from excessive heating. 

The NIST/CU technology eliminates these drawbacks while offering the possibility for random access two-dimensional control and a memory that lasts even with the power off.


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New Concept for Rechargeable Batteries [40]

 

A completely new concept for secondary batteries based on metal fluorides was developed by Dr. Maximilian Fichtner, Head of the Energy Storage Systems Group, and Dr. Munnangi Anji Reddy at the KIT Institute of Nanotechnology (INT). Metal fluorides may be applied as conversion materials in lithium-ion batteries. 

 

They also allow for lithium-free batteries with a fluoride-containing electrolyte, a metal anode, and metal fluoride cathode, which reach a much better storage capacity and possess improved safety properties. Instead of the lithium cation, the fluoride anion takes over charge transfer. At the cathode and anode, a metal fluoride is formed or reduced. 

 

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Material with Graphene-Like Properties [41]

 

Together with colleagues from Korea, Dr. Frederik Wolff-Fabris from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR, Germany) has developed and analyzed a material which possesses physical properties similar to graphene. 

 

Its structure also resembles iron pnictides, i.e. high temperature superconductors, and it definitely has a promising future:  Due to the position of the individual components in the Periodic Table of Elements, some of the atoms can simply be replaced by foreign atoms.  This creates new materials which can be superconductive, magnetic, or behave like topological insulators.

  

 

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Metamaterials [44]

Researchers at Northwestern University created a
metamaterial that's capable of steer electric currents in whichever direction is desired at the time. Switchable nanomaterials-materials that can change their properties and/or function in response to external stimuli - have potential applications in electronics, sensing and catalysis. 
 
Previous efforts to develop such materials have predominately used molecular switches that can modulate their properties by means of conformational changes.  

 

 

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Caltech Engineers Reveal How Scandium Trifluoride Contracts with Heat [45]

 

They shrink when you heat 'em. Most materials expand when heated, but a few contract. Now engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have figured out how one of these curious materials, scandium trifluoride (ScF3), does the trick - a finding, they say, that will lead to a deeper understanding of all kinds of materials. Materials that don't expand under heat aren't just an oddity.

They're useful in a variety of applications - in mechanical machines such as clocks, for example, that have to be extremely precise. Materials that contract could counteract the expansion of more conventional ones, helping devices remain stable even when the heat is on.

 

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Nanoparticle Purification System [46]

 

A team of Penn State scientists has invented a new system that uses magnetism to purify hybrid nanoparticles - structures that are composed of two or more kinds of materials in an extremely small particle that is visible only with an electron microscope. 

 

Team leaders Mary Beth Williams, an associate professor of chemistry, and Raymond Schaak, a professor of chemistry, explained that the never-before-tried method will help scientists to remove impurities from such particles. The method also will help researchers to distinguish between hybrid nanoparticles that appear to be identical when viewed under an electron microscope, but that have different magnetism - a great challenge in recent nanoparticle research. 

 

The system holds the promise of helping to improve drug-delivery systems, drug-targeting technologies, medical-imaging technologies and electronic information-storage devices.

 

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Transparent, Super-stretchy Sensor [Video 56]

 

An enviable elasticity is one of several new features built into a transparent skin-like pressure sensor that is the latest sensor developed by Stanford's Zhenan Bao, associate professor of chemical engineering, in her quest to create an artificial "super skin."

The sensor uses a transparent film of SWCNTs that act as tiny springs, enabling the sensor to accurately measure the force on it, whether it's being pulled like taffy or squeezed like a sponge.

 

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Thin Films of Nanodiamond [57-58]

A team of electrical engineers at Vanderbilt University has developed all the basic components needed to create microelectronic devices out of thin films of nanodiamond. They have created diamond versions of transistors and, most recently, logical gates, which are a key element in computers.

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Nanomechanical Resonators [60]

Yale University (U.S.) engineers recently demonstrated that nanomechanical resonators can operate at much higher amplitudes than previously thought. The results represent an advance in optomechanics, in which the force of light is used to control mechanical devices, and could have implications for future communications and sensing technologies.

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CNTs Effects on Green Algae [61]

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from Empa (CH) and the Agroscope Reckenholz-Taenikon (ART) Research Station have begun investigating the fundamentals of how CNTs behave when they are deposited in waterways and lakes.


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CNTs: Battery Boost [62]

A team of U.S. researchers discovered that nanotubes composed of titanium dioxide can switch their phase as a battery is cycled, gradually boosting their operational capacity.

Laboratory tests showed that new batteries produced with this material could be recharged up to half of their original capacity in less than 30 seconds .

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Amorphous Silicon [63]

A recent study carried out by researchers has revealed that the energy of amorphous silicon is 50% lower than the value commonly accepted until now. In the study published in the Physica Status Solidi-Rapid Research Letters, differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the energy of 20 samples grown by several deposition techniques.

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Printed Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites [63]

A collaboration between researchers at the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute and the Faculty of Mechatronics of Warsaw University of Technology in Poland reports that low electrical loss at frequencies of up to 220 GHz are possible in screen printed carbon nanotube polymer composites. Producing such low electrical loss materials potentially opens up new types of high frequency large area electronic devices.

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Shape Memory Materials [64]

University of Constance physicists Daniel Mutter and Peter Nielaba have visualized changes in shape memory materials down to the nanometric scale. Metallic alloys can be stretched or compressed in such a way that they stay deformed once the strain on the material has been released. Only shape memory alloys, however, can return to their original shape after being heated above a specific temperature.

For the first time, the authors determine the absolute values of temperatures at which shape memory nanospheres start changing back to their memorised shape - undergoing so-called structural phase transition.

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nanotimes 2010 - 2011

 

http://content.yudu.com/A1uc5z/Nanotimes09-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_09.pdf 

 


http://content.yudu.com/A1tyfc/Nanotimes08-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_08.pdf 

 


http://content.yudu.com/A1tef6/Nanotimes07-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_07.pdf 

 

 

http://content.yudu.com/A1so7f/Nanotimes05-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_05.pdf 

 

 

http://content.yudu.com/A1s8lz/Nanotimes04-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_04.pdf 


http://content.yudu.com/A1rtjl/Nanotimes03-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_03.pdf 


http://content.yudu.com/A1r38m/Nanotimes01-2011/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_11_01.pdf 


http://content.yudu.com/A1q7iq/Nanotimes11-2010/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_11.pdf 


http://content.yudu.com/A1pft8/Nanotimes09-2010/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_09.pdf 


http://content.yudu.com/A1owv0/Nanotimes08-2010/

PDF:  http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_08.pdf


http://content.yudu.com/A1oa1i/Nantimes05-2010/

PDF:  http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_05.pdf





http://content.yudu.com/A1n2ls/Nanotimes03-2010/

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_03.pdf


http://content.yudu.com/A1jcgv/Nanotimes02-2010

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_02.pdf


http://content.yudu.com/A1kl8a/Nanotimes01-2010/ 

PDF: http://www.nano-times.com/files/nanotimes_10_01.pdf

Best Regards  


IVCON-Team  
  


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